Venice Real Estate Trends with David Bramante & Kayla Horwat | Silicon Beach | Venice Beach | Malibu | Real Estate

David and Kayla discuss active properties that are currently for sale in Venice California, and give updates on the area. Here are the stats they mentioned:

Active Properties

  • Homes: Days on Market: 55  days / Average Price – $3.2M
  • Condos: Days on Market: 132 days  / Average Price – $2.4M
  • Income: Days on Market: 94 days  / Average Price – $3.3M

Sold Properties (last 30 days)

  • Homes: Days on Market: 30  days / Average Price – $2.4M
  • Condos: Days on Market: 44 days  / Average Price – $1.3M
  • Income: Days on Market: 38 days  / Average Price – $1.7M

Thanks for listening! Please let us know if you have any feedback and thanks for spreading the word about this podcast. For more information about David, visit www.DavidBramante.com.

If you’re looking to sell, buy or invest in Venice real estate, then visit www.BeachCanyon.com. If you’re looking to sell, buy or invest in Echo Park real estate, then visit www.BREinvestment.com. For either, call (323) 484-4695.

Developing Real Estate in the Silver Triangle with David Bramante | Silicon Beach | Venice Beach | Real Estate Investing

Developing Real Estate in the Silver Triangle with David Bramante | Silicon Beach | Venice Beach | Real Estate Investing

David discusses what he’s heard about real estate development in Venice, California’s Silver Triangle.

Thanks for listening! Please let us know if you have any feedback and thanks for spreading the word about this podcast. For more information about David, visit www.DavidBramante.com.

If you’re looking to sell, buy or invest in Venice real estate, then visit www.BeachCanyon.com. If you’re looking to sell, buy or invest in Echo Park real estate, then visit www.BREinvestment.com.

Venice Artist Robin Murez discusses the Venice Ball Park by the Silver Triangle | Silicon Beach | Venice Beach | Real Estate

David interviews his client and locally famous Venice Artist Robin Murez at Venice Ball Park, a Venice park she designed and created. This small open green space is located on Ocean Avenue, between South Venice Boulevard and Mildred Avenue, in Venice California.

While locals are shopping at the Venice Farmer’s Market today, David finds Robin at the Ball Park across the street with her neighbors, and they are weeding the public space. Interestingly, this activity of maintaining the public space now and helping spearhead the park space then (which took some time) are both prime examples of Robin’s long-standing history of public art and community involvement.

While Venice locals and tourists wonder about the area, especially around Abbot Kinney Boulevard, they will discover Robin’s public art in the neighborhood. And upon studying it a bit more closely they will find she blends her creative ideas for public sculptures and the rich history of the neighborhood together regularly (and she routinely honors the rich history of Venice Beach and the Venice Canals, and its pioneer developer Abbot Kinney in her work).

Her current project for the public is the Venice Carousel which will be located basically across the street at the Venice Library and the Venice of America Centennial Park. Contact Robin for more information about that project and how you might be able to sponsor and help fund the completion of that project.

Robin hired David and his real estate team, Beach Canyon (a Venice real estate team), to exclusively market and sell her beautiful home at 2408 Cloy Avenue, Venice, CA 90291. That home, nicknamed “Good Vibes” by Beach Canyon, is located in one of Venice’s best kept secret neighborhoods, the Silver Triangle. One of the primary ways of entering this neighborhood, is via Mildred by either hugging a left turn around the Ball Park, or by taking a right turn around Tesuque Village Market.

Thanks for listening! We would love to know your thoughts and find out how we can improve. If you have any comments or questions, then please let us know. And the best appreciation is by spreading the word about this podcast. David Bramante is a Venice CA Realtor. Additional notes:

Thanks for listening! Please let us know if you have any feedback and thanks for spreading the word about this podcast. For more information about David, visit www.DavidBramante.com.

If you’re looking to sell, buy or invest in Venice real estate, then visit www.BeachCanyon.com. If you’re looking to sell, buy or invest in Echo Park real estate, then visit www.BREinvestment.com.

Venice Homes for Sale with David Bramante & Kayla Horwat | Silicon Beach | Venice Beach | Real Estate

David and Kayla discuss Venice real estate trends over the last 30 days, the Venice Silver Triangle, and their newest exclusive listing located at 2408 Cloy Avenue, Venice, CA 90291.

Sold Listings
Number of Listings: 14 recently sold
Average Days on Market: 36 days
Average Price / SF: $1,387 PSF

Active Listings
Number of Listings: 22 for sale
Average Days on Market: 14 days
Average Price / SF: $2,122

Summary – Thank you for listening to The David Bramante Podcast! If you have any comments or questions, then please let our team know. We would love to know your thoughts and find out how we can improve… and of course if you like what we’re doing, then please spread the word about this podcast. Additional notes:

  • 2408 Cloy – Visit www.BeachCanyon.com/2408-cloy for more details about their new exclusive listing at 2408 Cloy, and email us for one of our Marketing Packages. This property is an incredible opportunity if you’re looking to buy a home in Venice, Los Angeles.

Thanks for listening! Please let us know if you have any feedback and thanks for spreading the word about this podcast. For more information about David, visit www.DavidBramante.com.

If you’re looking to sell, buy or invest in Venice real estate, then visit www.BeachCanyon.com. If you’re looking to sell, buy or invest in Echo Park real estate, then visit www.BREinvestment.com.

Realtor Marketing Ideas with Designer Amanda Bramante | Silicon Beach | Venice Beach | Real Estate

Amanda and David have a discussion about real estate open house signs and how they relate to  Beach Canyon‘s newest listing at 2408 Cloy Avenue, Venice, CA 90291.

Along with the team, David and Amanda exploring different ideas for stripping down and customizing the real estate experience, making Beach Canyon’s efforts in Venice real estate as smart and responsive as possible.

For over 10 years, David and Amanda have worked together on the branding and marketing of other projects, including BRE Investment in Echo Park, California. As the conversation progresses, their kids are screaming and their dogs are running around.

  • 2408 Cloy – Visit www.BeachCanyon.com/2408-cloy for more details about their new exclusive listing at 2408 Cloy, and email us for one of our Marketing Packages. This property is an incredible opportunity if you’re looking to buy a home in Venice, Los Angeles.

Thanks for listening! Please let us know if you have any feedback and thanks for spreading the word about this podcast. For more information about David, visit www.DavidBramante.com.

If you’re looking to sell, buy or invest in Venice real estate, then visit www.BeachCanyon.com. If you’re looking to sell, buy or invest in Echo Park real estate, then visit www.BREinvestment.com.

David Bramante Introduces his Podcast | Silicon Beach | Venice Beach | Real Estate

In this first episode of The David Bramante Podcast, Realtor David Bramante, from Beach Canyon (a Venice real estate team) and BRE Investment (an Echo Park real estate team), gives a quick and quiet introduction to his upcoming conversations creatively entitled The David Bramante Podcast.

He and his friends will be discussing real estate of course, but maybe more interestingly, will be interviewing local business owners and property owners in Los Angeles, especially in Venice, California.

Thanks for listening! Please let us know if you have any feedback and thanks for spreading the word about this podcast. For more information about David, visit www.DavidBramante.com.

If you’re looking to sell, buy or invest in Venice real estate, then visit www.BeachCanyon.com. If you’re looking to sell, buy or invest in Echo Park real estate, then visit www.BREinvestment.com.

Wild Wild Country and Rajneeshpuram real estate transactions | Rajneesh | Netflix

By David Bramante | March 25, 2018

Like most viewers, my wife and I finished watching the Netflix documentary Wild Wild Country last week and had a lot of unanswered questions about Rajneeshpuram. If you haven’t seen it yet, check out the trailer at the bottom of this post. Here are some of the more common questions I’m sure everyone had:

  • Was this documentary based on true events? (Yes!)
  • Why hadn’t we ever heard of Rajneesh and Rajneeshpuram? (We don’t know!)
  • What was so magical about Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh, later known as Osho? (No clue still!)
  • Where did all the money come from to run this type of operation?

And then… the Realtor and real estate investor in me starting asking some other questions. Really specific questions about the real estate involved, the transactions surrounding them, and any strategies involved in the acquisition and disposition of the property. I have questions like:

  • Who originally sold the real estate to the Rajneesh? What was the role, if any, of that seller during the events between 1981-1984?
  • At the time of acquisition, was the property listed for sale or was this an off-market deal privy only to locals?
  • As a follow-up, how does an investor in 1980-1981 find and acquire this type of property, especially being a foreign investor, when technology and data was so limited?
  • If you buy land out in nowhere, do you need any type of permits to built an entire city from scratch?
  • Who and how was the land acquired after the hay-day of Rajneeshpuram? Seems like the property traded hands, then strategically ended up in Young Life’s possession as a donation. Interesting…

Question: How does an investor in 1980-1981 find and acquire this type of property, especially being a foreign investor, when technology and data was so limited?

One of the questions I had really bugs me, and it is the one in which I try to imagine the scenario where a young Indian foreigner comes to the United States to purchase land for a Utopia.

This is especially true for Antelope, Oregon, circa 1980-1981, when Rajneesh’s personal secretary Ma Anand Sheela apparently had a budget around $6M to spend to built the group’s community. Without Zillow, Trulia, Redfin, LoopNet, and Costar, it is extremely difficult to imagine how anyone did anything before technology, especially when it came to land in such an obscure location as the Big Muddy Ranch in Oregon coupled with a foreign investment group.

From Wikipedia: “The city was on the site of a 64,229-acre (25,993 ha) Central Oregon property known as the Big Muddy Ranch, which was purchased in 1981 for $5.75 million ($15.5 million in today’s dollars).”

I can not even imagine a world where a foreigner comes to the United States of America, in the late ’70s and early ’80s looking for a large swath of land to purchase. For Realtors in Los Angeles, circa 2018, the technology and information at both real estate agents’ and brokers’ finger tips is only slightly more advanced than real estate investors. While title information is still limited, nearly everything else is being rapidly more transparent.

Question: If you buy land out in nowhere, do you need any type of permits to built an entire city from scratch?

From The Oregonian / OregonLive: “Rajneesh Investment Corp., the ranch owner, sought permission to develop a 95-lot subdivision soon after the incorporation. Although that plan was never carried out, the city issued 304 building permits for other residential and commercial development. By the end of 1982, the city had issued two dozen business licenses, mostly to Rajneesh Neo-Sannyas International Commune.”

Question: Who and how was the land acquired after the hay-day of Rajneeshpuram?

The other question that I would like answered is how the disposition of this property was handled, or mishandled, and who may have financially benefited from all of this?

It would seem the first owner in these chain of real estate transactions around this huge land sale, the original seller to the Osho, did extremely well but it’s hard to compare. What was the asking price versus the purchase price? What was the market rate for a large amount of obscure land?

Then, once politically and legally damaged, what could possibly be fair market value for Rajneeshpuram at the time of disposition? Could someone have benefited from an artificially depressed price, especially when thousands of people had built an entire city from scratch…

I’m still researching title on this one. 🙂

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David Bramante is the CEO and Team Leader of Keller Williams Realty Downtown Los Angeles, and the founder of BRE Investment in Echo Park.

He has been a top producing California Realtor since 2005, helping clients sell, buy, invest and lease residential and commercial real estate in Los Angeles.

As a real estate consultant, he has hired, mentored and coached over 150 Realtors in Southern California, including many top producing Realtors in Los Angeles County.

For questions about the above blog post, becoming a real estate agent, or joining Keller Williams Realty, send an email to David directly at david (at) breinvestment.com or davidbramante (at) kw.com. 

Applying Ray Dalio’s Believability from his book Principles | Silicon Beach | Venice Beach | Real Estate

By David Bramante  |  March 18, 2018

During our Mentee Mastermind conversation at Keller Williams Realty Downtown Los Angeles on Friday, we were discussing how to best deal with the issue of completing and properly documenting the 10 property previews per week requirement.

The book, The Millionaire Real Estate Agent written by Gary Keller and usually referred to as the MREA, states that a top-producing real estate agent will follow the following formula for success:

  • 10 owner conversations per day
  • 10 database entries per day
  • 10 personalized notes per day
  • 10 property previews per week

So as our 17 real estate agents at KW Downtown LA were discussing the amount of work required to follow the MREA and stay in the Mentee Mastermind contest, coined during the conversation the #AlphaAgents project, we struggled as a group on how the agents could properly document the previews online. (We started with 18 agents, but one agent tapped out this week).

The initial recommendation was that our KW agents would take 10 selfies at the properties they visited (open houses for residential agents and property visits for commercial agents).

What we have seen over the last two weeks has been all over the place… some of the agents in the group took photos of property exteriors and interiors, some took photos of only addresses with their selfie, some took pictures of the MLS print-outs usually found at cooperating agent open houses… and yet many more did not do any previews at all. We want uniformity for the contest.

The top three agents in terms of completing property previews for the week were Rosie Mazariegos, Summer Gorjian, and Matthew Blessing. In my mind, they had the microphone.

So as I opened the conversation up about how to best resolve the issue of proving property previews, I expected one of my top three to steer the conversation and teach the rest of the group and set the rules for the contest in this specific category.

They would talk about taking multiple photos at each open house which include some sort of selfie, open house sign and an interior right? Nope. All of a sudden agents who had not completed any open house previews whatsoever felt comfortable chiming in on how this party of our Mentee Mastermind / Alpha Agents contest should be conducted and that overall this requirement was too difficult.

This sounded the alarms in my mind because the book I recently read and had recently become addicted to, titled Principles by Ray Dalio, was being ignored. What I was listening to and experiencing was a violation of one of the main principles in Ray’s book, and that was a violation of his rule on “believability” and so I needed to correct the conversation and remind the group of this core belief.

As one of the agents who hadn’t completed any previews from the week continued to talk about this and that with the contest’s previews and social media posting requirements, I realized that she was confident, that she was persuasive, and that she had no believability in the category of previews. Worse, my top three quietly listened to her and this was dangerous.

Alarming… she had the entire floor during the conference call and 16 other agents were actively pondering her thoughts. They may take her advice and form their businesses around what she was saying, which was not based on anything other than opinions.

As the Team Leader of KW DTLA, I have routinely experienced this issue, but never was it more painfully obvious. I was actively looking at all my agents’ stats on the call in my Google Sheets tracker and sure enough, an agent with a glaring zero in this category was weighing in happily about this category. An agent with zero credibility in this category was happily sharing her opinion and knowingly or unknowingly trying to influence the agents in the contest.

These are the moments where I need to get involved, remind the group of our core principles, about the book Principles, and the concept of believability. I politely interrupted our talkative and “unbelievable” agent (on this topic) after a few seconds, and reminded the Mentee Masterminds that our brokerage, KW DTLA, believes in believability and that the opinions of the most active agents in the preview category had the floor.

I called on Rosie first, since she had done 20 property previews in the week, then I called on Summer who had done 17 previews. As the book Principles states, the person with the most experience takes on the role of teacher, while the challenger and would-be debater (or show-boater) takes on the role of student.

This was one of the moments, though seemingly very minor, that I was able to course correct the group and specifically outline one of our brokerage’s beliefs in 2018. It felt great and it probably seemed relatively minor.

What happened is so routine that no one usually notices, and so dangerous that those who are aware of this rule need to setup and make the group aware of what is happening. I couldn’t believe I had to re-introduce the concept of believability.

PS In case you’re wondering what the group settled on, we stated that there needs to be 10 images posted on Instagram, with descriptions of the properties and the hashtags: #AlphaAgents #KWDTLA and #KWDowntownLA. The posts should be shared to a linked Facebook account, so that our office can quickly find and count the preview posts for each agent.

PSS The featured image of this post is from my Instagram, where I’m doing handstands in front of agent’s open houses… to preview that I visited the open houses and I’m believable.

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David Bramante is the Team Leader & Managing Partner of Keller Williams Realty Downtown Los Angeles, and the manager of BRE Investment in Echo Park.

He has been a top producing California Realtor since 2005, helping clients sell, buy, invest and lease residential and commercial real estate in Los Angeles.

As a real estate consultant, he has hired, mentored and coached over 150 Realtors in Southern California, including many top producing Realtors in Los Angeles County.

For questions about the above blog post, becoming a real estate agent, or joining Keller Williams Realty, send an email to David directly at david (at) breinvestment.com or davidbramante (at) kw.com. 

Robert Hahn’s ideas of the future of real estate brokerage | Silicon Beach | Venice Beach | Real Estate

By David Bramante | March 4, 2018

I just finished reading “The Future of Brokerage Black Paper” by Robert Hahn and Sunny Lake (see below), and I’ve sent it to a handful of top agents and brokerage owners for them to read and weigh in on the ideas. I want to strike a conversation up with these agents about the issues I have been actively wrestling with as a Lead Agent of BRE Investment and now as a Team Leader at Keller Williams Realty Downtown Los Angeles, and I want these conversations and some answers to my questions like… yesterday.

When I ran BRE Investment LLC on its own and out of an office in Silver Lake, in the historic landmark Neutra Office Building, I had a handful of full-time and salaried employees at the brokerage company. And what started out as a boutique real estate company which handled property management, leasing, Airbnb supervision, and brokerage sales in Silver Lake and Echo Park, it eventually dissolved back to its core competency of services… my core competency of real estate sales in Echo Park.

This was a boomerang back to my origin story, because the success of my sales in the area allowed me the opportunity to expand our services, and that uncontrolled expansions which I allowed was the reason we had to retract. As I have told many people over the last few years, I wish I had never expanded our services and I wish I had brought in some commission-based agents. I thought about it on a weekly basis for nearly two years but did not act on any of it, because I allowed myself to be distracted by the new problems we were handling.

Through the experience of running BRE Investment and leading the scope creep of its services, I learned that I had made several mistakes in my calculations of what an effective real estate team / boutique real estate brokerage was about. And looking back, I was ultimately not able to create the winning formula for a boutique brokerage with an eye on expanding into other hip areas, like Venice. What was missing with BRE Investment in those years?

As a recap, I believe me being the only rainmaker on the team selling real estate, and having a staff that focused on the wrong services (management, leasing and Airbnb) was a losing formula. After two years, I went from a single agent to an agent with a team and offering “full-service real estate services” to a single agent yet again. And not much to show for it, except from an imaginary PHD in real estate brokerage. My experiment in expansion had gone terribly, terribly wrong. I slowly and sadly fired the staff one by one, and focused on real estate sales exclusively as a one man band like the old days.

I was older and the world around me in Echo Park had changed. My peers in the area, like Courtney and Kurt, and Tracy Do Real Estate, had increased the size and success of their real estate teams and had dialed in their marketing to very impressive levels. Things on the Eastside had gotten much more competitive in 2017 compared to the old days of 2005 when I first started selling real estate in Echo Park. I realized at that point in early 2017, it made little sense to be a single rainmaker agent, in any way that I looked at it, and I wanted to join a brokerage again.

I started examining my real estate business decisions with regard to building a real estate brokerage. I started reading like a maniac, trying to crack the code on what had gone wrong. I had clearly missed something so obvious. Neglected what haunted me every week. All that wasted time and energy, and all those wasted paychecks I cut every two weeks. It was was a transfer of my commission wealth to my salaried employee’s wealth, and I had brought in all the business… so that stung and made me sick.

And so in that mindset I began examine joining a real estate brokerage again. I had worked at Sotheby’s, Re/Max, Re/Max Commercial, Marcus & Millichap, Keller Williams Realty Santa Monica, and briefly worked with Brock Harris’ mentor Leslie and with Clint Lukens at Clint Lukens Realty.

I ultimately decided to go back to Keller Williams, but this time in Downtown Los Angeles. I knew the ownership and after joining I began discussing taking on a leadership role in the office. While me coming into the brokerage alone was a shift at the office merely because the office didn’t have a Team Leader for about six months, my activities were to be focused on the numbers: agent count and company dollar. I wanted to work on these, and continue to sell with my clientele, but with a vengeance. I brought BRE Investment the brand into KW DTLA, and was given a mandate to change KW DTLA once and for all. Previous leaders without sales experience and without experience in managing an office had all failed. So this seemed like a win-win.

The main request was that I recruit, recruit, recruit because that would directly impact company dollar. This was something I felt I should have done, only after the fact, at BRE Investment. And so I would take my skills as a listing agent with a bizarre appreciation for cold calling and start contacting the agents in the area.

And so after six months as the Team Leader of Keller Williams Downtown LA, and as the owner of BRE Investment 2.0, I’ve been reading hard and fast on how a skilled salesperson can quickly become a proficient manager, and how focusing on being a leader is significantly better than micromanaging as a manager. I am consuming books at an alarming rate, and I love it. And I’m re-reading the ones that bring the most value to me and my agents, recommending some of them so that we’re all on the same page and speaking the same language and so that I can change the culture from the inside out.

I started as the Team Leader on September 1, 2017 and officially took control of the position on October 1, 2017. So now six months into the role, we have Keller Williams Realty’s Family Reunion event in Anaheim. After being at the event and hearing Gary Keller’s Vision Speech, I tracked the activity online as I thought about the ideas. I was quickly on Inman.com, and I found and read Robert Hahn’s and Sunny Lake’s “black” white paper on the idea of the future of brokerage, and what they envision is the financially successful future of the broker-agent relationship. This is the very problem I have seen and thought about for years.

Experiencing the different pressures of a real estate brokerage first hand, and having started several real estate tech companies myself, Robert and Sunny are asking the questions everyone in real estate should be asking (and should have been asking for a while):

  • How is technology going to affect the industry for its current-role players?
  • What’s the most financially sustainable version of a real estate brokerage now and in the future for its current players?

From where I stand, these are the two important questions of the day. These are the most important questions of the day. So even though it’s always on my mind and in my conversations, Robert Hahn is making me think hard and fast about the future of the real estate brokerage.

I’m approaching my role as Team Leader at Keller Williams DTLA like a would-be CEO of a real estate tech company, and I’m only more interested in that now that Gary Keller has announced to the world that KW is a tech company (as of 2018). I actually met with the Josh Team at KWRI in Austin in early December 2017, and spoke to their team about some of the tech ideas that I had.

I’m obsessed with the book “Lean Startup” and tech culture, have taken Ruby on Rails classes at General Assembly, created real estate tech companies and now I have all of that experience juxtaposed against the new experiences I have had as the Team Leader of the office for the last six months. And I’m asking my self how to I reconcile all I have learned with the future of real estate brokerage.

Blog Notes:

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David Bramante is the Team Leader & Managing Partner of Keller Williams Realty Downtown Los Angeles, and the manager of BRE Investment in Echo Park.

He has been a top producing California Realtor since 2005, helping clients sell, buy, invest and lease residential and commercial real estate in Los Angeles.

As a real estate consultant, he has hired, mentored and coached over 150 Realtors in Southern California, including many top producing Realtors in Los Angeles County.

For questions about the above blog post, becoming a real estate agent, or joining Keller Williams Realty, send an email to David directly at david (at) breinvestment.com or davidbramante (at) kw.com. 

Become a top producing Realtor. Initiate yourself and walk on fire.

By David Bramante | March 2, 2018

I was talking to Summer earlier this week, discussing how we were going to launch the Keller Williams Realty Mentee Mastermind in the Downtown Los Angeles office. We were only a few days away, and I was struggling with the proper way of how we should roll this program out. I didn’t want to have a normal business meeting that was boring and typical, and I didn’t want to do anything that was too extreme like walking on fire.

I had been reading more and more about persuasion and compliance techniques over the previous two weeks. That weekend I actually finished a book (for the second time) weekend called “Influence: The Psychology of Persuasion” and there were several interesting topics:

  • How was Jim Jones (who started the People’s Temple cult) was able to lead his followers to their doom, seemingly so easily? And…
  • No matter who or where they are performed, why won’t crazy initiations and painful hazing rituals disappear?

Seems like cult leaders and hazing rituals are uniquely part of the human experience from what the book tells us, and as I thought about those two ideas nearly simultaneously, I thought two words: Anthony. Robbins. His “Unleash the Power Within” (UPW) events, which I have been to three over the last few years and had sent almost 10 people to go experience it by themselves, work on so many levels in controlling people’s behavior. The compliance techniques used are some times so obvious that’s it’s frustrating to see and still comply with.

Then I thought about the fire. Why the fire? How the hell does he convince thousands of people in one day (over 10 hours) to walk on fire? And on all the days of the four-day event, how does he persuade the large majority of these people, including me, to do something they would never ever do on their own?

And then I caught myself. Tony Robbins is really a genius in his simplicity. With the fire, he’s taking a page right out of the play book of initiations and hazing. Firewalking is so clearly a rite of passage that it seems nearly no one, prior to the fire or after, asked what that was really all about. It was an initiate, and that’s that and the whole experience is basically overlooked in how it’s effective for the rest of the four day program.

The amazing part about the entire experience is really not firewalking part. Or that more people don’t get hurt part. But that no one I met out at any of these events stops and wonders if there’s an alterior motive to the rite of passage. It’s self evident that once you did it, then nothing is the same afterward. But it’s amazing that no one I met ever asks, “Why does Tony have you walk on fire?”

No the question is always, and I know because I’m always asked and I asked others as well a simple question:

  • “So… did you do it? Did you walk on fire?!”
  • When someone says, “Yes I did it!” I think and others definitely say, “Right on!”
  • But when someone says, “No, I didn’t because it was late and I was tired and this and that and my cat needed to be fed at midnight…” well then, you as a fire walker think something interesting… you judge them and think they’re not on the team. They’re the worse thing possible, an outsider to the firewalk family.

After several years, I just realized why Tony Robbin’s had me walk on fire. He hazed me and I never even really asked why it all happen. The theatrics were so great, each time. So standing on the roof of the Macy’s parking structure at The Bloc in Downtown LA, I told Summer my tiny epiphany. Not a big one, not a life changing one. Really a totally obvious one. And then I told her we need to initiate the mentees joining the KW DTLA Mentee Mastermind, so for them their lives would never be the same. To create a pin in their minds of AD/BC events with the program.

She laughed and said, “You want to haze the agents?” I said, “No, no. I just want to initiate them.” And that’s how the concepts of group meditation, writing down goals, listening to a Navy Seal speech, having them walk down 29 stairs… and having them run around and interview business formed. It’s a new ritual, only a few days old, and we’re going to work out the details. Firewalking was already taken.

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David Bramante is the Team Leader & Managing Partner of Keller Williams Realty Downtown Los Angeles, and the manager of BRE Investment in Echo Park.

He has been a top producing California Realtor since 2005, helping clients sell, buy, invest and lease residential and commercial real estate in Los Angeles.

As a real estate consultant, he has hired, mentored and coached over 150 Realtors in Southern California, including many top producing Realtors in Los Angeles County.

For questions about the above blog post, becoming a real estate agent, or joining Keller Williams Realty, send an email to David directly at david (at) breinvestment.com or davidbramante (at) kw.com. 

Some notes:

Tony Robbins Unleash the Power Within: https://www.tonyrobbins.com/events/unleash-the-power-within/

Firewalking: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Firewalking